The Senior Advisor “Sensei”; Knowledge and Wisdom Transfer of the Lean TPS

The Senior Advisor “Sensei”; Knowledge and Wisdom Transfer of the Lean TPS

Meet my Sensei Mr. Sadao ‘Sam’ Nomura. Sam is a Senior Advisor with Toyota Industries Corporation (TICO). Sam worked for more than forty years teaching the Toyota Production System. One of Sam’s greatest accomplishments, he related to me , was how successful his TPS methods were at the Toyota vehicle plant in South Africa. With a unionized workforce of over nine thousand workers, the plant was producing the worst quality vehicles in the world. Over a few short years, Sam’s TPS Methods enabled the South African plant to export vehicles  and to become one of Toyota’s best quality plants.
Mr_Nomura_&Me_Jan30IMG_0142

I met Sam for the first time when he came to visit the Raymond Brantford plant as part of his contract with TICO. His mission was to guide the North American Material Handling Group on  ‘How To” achieve the three year Dantotsu “Best of the Best” Quality targets set by Japan. Nomura visited several North American facilities to teach his TPS methods and to guide the group on meeting their individual targets. Sam would state that by using his TPS methods;  the defect rate would be reduced by more than ninety percent over a three year period. Sam made many trips to North America between 2007 – 2010, guiding the Brantford plant to some amazing quality improvement and efficiency gains. More in a future post. For now I would like to introduce you to one of Mr. Nomura’s works of art, his A3 Kaizen suggestions he presents to the Managers.

Mr Nomura was famous for creating what we came to call “ Nomura-grams”. During Sam’s many visits, he would hold a small piece of paper in the palm of his hand during the “Go See” Genchi Genbutsu tours of the plants and offices. By mid-morning on day two, Sam would produce the piece of paper, unfold it and ask for it to be printed on an A3 (11 x 17) size piece of paper. I am going to end this blog with a link to Mr. Sam Nomura “Nomura-gram #31”. Of particular importance to me on this A3 was the Thank You Sam gave me for the TPS Training I was leading.

Nomura #31 Jan 31 2007

BTW: Sam asked me for a copy of my training material.  I can only guess that Sam was so impressed when he saw the TPS Training program, Story Board (see previous post) that he wanted to show his bosses back in Japan my good work in Brantford. Another topic for a future post.

Lean for 6S

Mr_Nomura_&Me_Jan30IMG_0142 David Devoe & Mr. Sadao Nomura

Meet my Sensei Mr. Sadao ‘Sam’ Nomura. Sam is a Senior Advisor with Toyota Industries Corporation (TICO). Sam worked for more than forty years teaching the Toyota Production System. One of Sam’s greatest accomplishments, he related to me , was how successful his TPS methods were at the Toyota vehicle plant in South Africa. With a unionized workforce of over nine thousand workers, the plant was producing the worst quality vehicles in the world. Over a few short years, Sam’s TPS Methods enabled the South African plant to export vehicles  and to become one of Toyota’s best quality plants.

I met Sam for the first time when he came to visit the Raymond Brantford plant as part of his contract with TICO. His mission was to guide the North American Material Handling Group on  ‘How To” achieve the three year Dantotsu “Best of the Best”…

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The Senior Advisor “Sensei”; Knowledge and Wisdom Transfer of the Lean TPS

Mr_Nomura_&Me_Jan30IMG_0142
David Devoe & Mr. Sadao Nomura
Meet my Sensei Mr. Sadao ‘Sam’ Nomura. Sam is a Senior Advisor with Toyota Industries Corporation (TICO). Sam worked for more than forty years teaching the Toyota Production System. One of Sam’s greatest accomplishments, he related to me , was how successful his TPS methods were at the Toyota vehicle plant in South Africa. With a unionized workforce of over nine thousand workers, the plant was producing the worst quality vehicles in the world. Over a few short years, Sam’s TPS Methods enabled the South African plant to export vehicles  and to become one of Toyota’s best quality plants.

I met Sam for the first time when he came to visit the Raymond Brantford plant as part of his contract with TICO. His mission was to guide the North American Material Handling Group on  ‘How To” achieve the three year Dantotsu “Best of the Best” Quality targets set by Japan. Nomura visited several North American facilities to teach his TPS methods and to guide the group on meeting their individual targets. Sam would state that by using his TPS methods;  the defect rate would be reduced by more than ninety percent over a three year period. Sam made many trips to North America between 2007 – 2010, guiding the Brantford plant to some amazing quality improvement and efficiency gains. More in a future post. For now I would like to introduce you to one of Mr. Nomura’s works of art, his A3 Kaizen suggestions he presents to the Managers.

Mr Nomura was famous for creating what we came to call “ Nomura-grams”. During Sam’s many visits, he would hold a small piece of paper in the palm of his hand during the “Go See” Genchi Genbutsu tours of the plants and offices. By mid-morning on day two, Sam would produce the piece of paper, unfold it and ask for it to be printed on an A3 (11 x 17) size piece of paper. I am going to end this blog with a link to Mr. Sam Nomura “Nomura-gram #31”. Of particular importance to me on this A3 was the Thank You Sam gave me for the TPS Training I was leading.

Nomura #31 Jan 31 2007

BTW: Sam asked me for a copy of my training material.  I can only guess that Sam was so impressed when he saw the TPS Training program, Story Board (see previous post) that he wanted to show his bosses back in Japan my good work in Brantford. Another topic for a future post.

Jidoka Blame-Free Problem Solving at the Site Lean 5S Thinking

 Jidoka Blame-Free Problem Solving  Process:

One of the most important Elements of the Jidoka process is that problems once identified at the site are presented, analyzed and solved in a “blame-free” environment.  In my experiences Teaching hundreds of students in the basic introduction to the Lean  Thinking Jidoka process of continuous improvement is that, for the most effective way for a organization to show Respect for People is to stop blaming the people for the mistakes, errors, problems and focus on solving the problems and establish the evironment necessary for the  Continuous improvement process to be sustainable.

When the Team members believe in the blame free Jidoka process their are more committed to a Lean culture of accountability, and with Leadership focused on maintaining the highest level of Respect for People a blame free culture of problem solving can be sustainable.  This means that all problems need to be reviewed in terms of the root cause of the problem and specifically directed to changes to future actions or procedures, not to be made personal, but are to address future actions – no fault, – no blame.

When there is a Blame-Free environment committed to continuous improvement, when management can “Go See “and “Identify” problems through “Visualization”, and  take ownership of  Lean 55 auditing process, only when managers put themselves the Person-In-Charge will they show the Leadership necessary to the Team to make the blame free Jidoka problem solving culture of finding the True Root Causes of problems,that lead the team to Take Blame-Free  Action (“JUST DO IT”).

Blame-free problem solving at the site:

  1. Reason for Stop (detection of abnormality)
  2. What Happened (Problem)
  3. Why did this happen (use 5 WHYs)
  4. Cause of Defect (find True Root Cause)
  5. Immediate Actions for Current Problem
  6. Recommended Preventive Actions to be taken in Future (Action Plan)

8 Step Problem Solving Guide:

  1. Clarify the Problem
  2. Break Down the Problem
  3. Set a Target
  4. Determine the Root Cause
  5. Develop Countermeasures
  6. See Countermeasure Through
  7. Confirm Results & Process
  8. Standardize Successful Processes

Jidoka Definition:

Jidoka is also known as Autonomation or automation with human intelligence. Jidoka provide machine and operator the ability to detect when an abnormal condition has occurred and immediately stop work, call attention to the situation and wait for leader decision

The Purpose of Jidoka Implementation:

Implementation is to diagnose the defect immediately at the site and correct it accordingly. Jidoka cuts waste, improves quality, productivity and profitability. Detecting an abnormal condition does no good, though, unless there is follow-up. Visual controls are just decoration unless they trigger action.

 

 

A Continuous Improvement Culture starts with Lean 5S Thinking

A sustainable Culture of Lean 5S Thinking is an imperative for any organization today that hope to compete and become a World Class continuously improving Lean Enterprise.  All the top performing World Class Lean Organizations have in their DNA some form of a 5S Thinking culture. In spite of the increasing popularity of 5S, many managers still misunderstand the true essence of the 5S Thinking, and as a result do not get the full benefit or value from their 5S journey. 

          In my experiences after teaching, training and coaching more than six hundred Workers over the past ten years leading 5S programs is that, if the 5S Thinking is not part of the organization’s DNA after the first one to three years, the Senior Management of the organization is simply trying to do Lean which is wrong and doomed to fail like so many other weak leadership initiatives. I recommend for any organization interested in experimenting with Lean to start with Teaching & Training of the 5S’s to the point there is a 5S Thinking Culture of Continuous Improvement. 

          When an organization’s senior Management Team truly has the Respect for Workers, and Value Workers Contributions a culture of 5S Thinking Workers will be the catalyst that drives the continuous improvement processes improving both customer products, and services provided. The cost of starting a 5S Program is relatively Risk Free in my experiences. For the most part organizations have a generous supply of low hanging, low cost improvement ideas that the Workers can generate to make the 5S program self-sustaining. I recommend for any organization that is planning a Lean Enterprise journey to start with My Lean for 6S Basic 5S Training Module #1 followed same day by the 1/2 Day Basic 5S Workshop. The Workshops are a great opportunity for working groups of 7-10 people to come together to become a Team of problem solving Workers.

         Although too often, 5S is understood to be just basic housekeeping of the office or manufacturing environments, in fact, 5S Thinking is much more than that, it is the foundation for any organization’s sustainability and ultimate survival. The starting point for any organization wanting to compete today requires a culture of innovation and creativity to drive the continuous improvement cycle. At the heart of My Lean 5S Training module #1 is the cycle of plan do check act and My Basic 5S Workshops is the perfect starting point for an organization to start a Lean Enterprise journey.

The A3 Format attached is a condensed version of My Module #1 Basic 5S Training PowerPoint consisting of 37 basic 5S slides. See  A3 Module #1 5S

David Devoe ASQ-CSSBB

Lean for 6S

 

Toyota Business Practices value of The Toyota Way ‘Respect for People’ and ‘Continuous Improvement’ in solving problems using the 8 Step process.

The Toyota Business Practices (TBP) Guidelines announced by Fujio Cho in April 2005 to all members of Toyota Motor Corporation (TMC) provided a problem solving framework for the company to follow that would lead them to their goal to be a global competitor.  The 8 Step Process Model would ensure Toyota achieve their goals of becoming the market share leaders. Reading The Toyota Way guidelines alone would not bring full understanding of the Value of The Toyota Way two main pillars of support; “Continuous Improvement” and “Respect for People” are the key concept behind the 8 Step Process problem solving Model. The Toyota Business Practices’ 8 Step Process drives the continuous improvement effort and the dedication to The Toyota Way Principles ensures the PDCA cycle.

In 2006, I received Toyota Business Practices Toyota Production System Training materials and practiced The Toyota Way Principle of 8 Step problem solving during a 3 month study assignment of the Toyota Production System (TPS) hosted by Toyota Industries Corporation (TICO) headquartered in Kariya, Japan.  My TPS training facility, Logistics & Forklifts (L&F), is located in Takahama, Japan.  L&F is the largest facility (330,000 sq. m, 10 major buildings) of its kind in the world manufacturing small lot production high mix using the Toyota Production System. I have used The Toyota Way 8 step approach to solving problems for the past 10 years with some amazing results. When I ran my Lean Six Sigma Fault Tree Analysis (Root Cause Analysis) workshop to Engineers and Managers using the A3 8 Step approach the project results were outstanding.  I plan on posting some of my library of A3 Projects using the 8 Step Format in the very near future.

For now I am attaching a picture story board of the classic 8 Step approach to solving the problem solving example the Toyota Motor Corporation uses to teach the Engineers and Managers; ‘Developing a World Class Engine’

The Toyota Way 8D Capture
8D Problem Solving The Toyota Way

 

I would welcome your feedback on my innovative way of presenting the 8 Step process in the Story Board Format below.  Leanfor6Sblog.wordpress.com David Devoe CSSBB

 

Lean Creativity and Innovative Continuous Improvement through Jishuken Activity A3

Below is a A3 example I am going to use to demonstrate the Hoshin Planning concept used in the Toyota Production System (TPS) key training principle known as ‘Jishuken’.  Hoshin planning is  a  strategic planning methodology Toyota uses to cascade the   yearly goals and objectives  throughout  the  organization,  from  top management  to the front line worker. Jishuken is a management  directed Kaizen  activity  which means incremental continuous improvement  that  Toyota  Industries Corporation (TICO) uses to develop or “level up” the TPS  essential  skills  of  their Managers.  Management identifies key areas  of  the business unit that need improvement and  direct the  managers to  conduct hands-on Kaizen in  the ‘Gemba’. This is where the work is done. The Jishuken good Kaizen results are then spread throughout the organization by “Yokoten”, a process of sharing the improvement laterally and horizontally across the organization.

A3 Jishuken Capture

In my A3 example above I have included in section III an example of the human resources development results for both the Core Jishuken Members as well as the member summary from each location  and  key  measure of the  effect  from  the example.  The Kaizen  Ability base line measures are used by Management to decide where the areas of improvement for the  Jishuken. I  have  also  included an example of  the level of Leadership  required for the Jishuken to be taken seriously by the management. The section  IV  Action  plan  I  identify Susumu ‘Sonny’ Toyoda, past  President  of  Toyota  Industrial  Equipment  Manufacturing, and  who  is  currently  a  Managing  Officer  at  Toyota  Industries  Corporation  (TICO)  to illustrate the level of Leadership required. The key message; when the Jishuken Leader is one  of  the  highest  ranking  officers  of  the  organization  and  they  are  fully committed, engaged, and actively supporting the  action  plan  by  Genchi  Genbutsu,  ‘Go See’  another key  principle  of  The Toyota Way,  world  class  results  are  achievable.   The  Jishuken  TPS culture creates fully engaged  employees  who  will have  the  tools  to sustain  Creative  and Innovative Continuous Improvement.